Sunday, November 20, 2011

GreenStitch Episode 49 - Care for some tea?


Surprise! An actual tutorial! Hope you enjoy this fun little tea wallet - so easy to make out of fabric scraps. (Oh, and for the full podcast, just click here.)


For your cover pieces, cut two strips, 6" by 10" -- also cut a strip of interfacing 6" by 10".

For your pocket pieces, cut three contrasting strips, 4 1/2" by 7".

On your pocket strips, press under about 1/4" on the short end. Then press lengthwise each one forms a double-thick piece, 2 1/4" by 6 3/4".

Put your first pocket strip in place on top of the interfacing and one cover strip (save the other cover strip for later.) Make sure the folded edge is pointing up and it'll be about 1 1/2" from the top raw edges. Align the raw edges on the left, and have the folded-under edge on the right side. Stitch close to the raw edges along the bottom of the strip.

Lay your second pocket strip on top of the first, just moving the folded edge down; stitch the raw edge into place. Do the same with the third strip.

You can see here how the pockets are forming. Stitch along the left-hand edge (the folded-under pocket edges, through all thicknesses). I also used a straightedge to mark my middle row of stitching.

I actually ended up doing two rows of stitching down the middle, because I thought it might make it fold easier when full, but I don't think it makes that much difference.

Layer your pocket assembly with the other cover strip, wrong sides together. Cut a curved edge through all three layers (two fabrics, one interfacing) - you can see the fancy guide I used!

Apply bias binding. I cut my strip 1 1/2" wide, and pressed under 1/4" on the edge that would later be hand-stitched onto the other side. This is just an ordinary quilt binding technique, and made a much tidier edge than trying to turn it inside-out. It does need to be bias, so it'll go smoothly over that curved edge.

Binding done!


Now, just choose a button and make a buttonhole. Be careful when stitching the button on - you'll want to reach inside the pocket so you don't stitch it closed.


Six teabags, ready to roll.

Here's the quickie version out of a shirt cuff. I just moved the buttons in and did a very narrow zigzag stitch to join the edges together.
I forgot to take photos of the door draft stopper before I mailed it off, but Maureen will send me one later. In the meantime, here's a video I found that explains the buttonhole stitch technique I mentioned (also known as blanket stitch) - so handy!


21 comments:

  1. Thank you, you just solved the problem of what to give two different people!!

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  2. Hi, and thanks for this cute pattern! I have a question - I am making one for myself and one (or maybe more) for a friend. Is there any stitching that goes through all three layers, so it shows on the outside? I have some seams/lines showing on the outside, and wonder if that is correct?
    I appreciate any help you can give me.
    Gerda in Alberta

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  3. Thank you for taking the time for this tutorial. I had never heard of a tea wallet and simply love the idea. I have two tea drinkers at work that I am going to try to make these for.

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  4. Gerda - I did all my pocket-attaching before I added the back (outside cover) and bound the whole thing - so no, I didn't have any visible stitching on the outside. I wouldn't call it wrong to do so, though - just gives you a different design element! Thanks for all the sweet comments, everyone.

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  5. This is a adorable tea wallet!

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  6. Hi Anne. Firstly, Im using my sons ("weird kid") blog account, as I dont have my own. I would also have prefered to e-mail you, but for some reason the link wouldnt work.... so apologies for putting this in the wrong spot, but I needed to say a heartfelt THANKYOU for your wonderful podcasts & blog! I have found them at just the right time in my life. I had stopped quilting for a long time because of bad depression, but your podcasts have motivated & inspired me to begin again with a new focus. Last night I deconstucted a skirt to make an apron, and it felt good to have sewing back in my hands. I also have a small t-shirt to convert into a girls bag as a christmas gift to a friends child. I truly am grateful that I found your podcasts. Joanne (from Australia) :)

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  7. Anne, this is so cute! I just wanted you to know I so appreciate your upbeat podcasts, I appreciate your go green attitude, it gives me such ideas, I try to reuse but sometimes you run out of ideas then I will hear about a way you did it, and off I am to try it. Happy Holidays to you and all your family.

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  8. Hi Anne, thank you so much for the great tutorial. I'm going to try and make a bigger version to use as a document holder.
    Happy holidays and hope to have a podcast from you soon.

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  9. Ladies, so sorry for delayed reply here, but thank you so much for the nice comments. I really appreciate all your kind thoughts!

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  10. Really great project. I made something similar for my tea loving mom. I used denim and an outgrown onesie from mt son. She had given him both. I wanted to have a photo added, but our ink jet printet keeps drying out the heads.

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  11. I actually ended up doing two rows of stitching down the middle, because I thought it might make it fold easier when full, but I don't think it makes that much difference.

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  12. Thank you for taking the time for this tutorial. I had never heard of a tea wallet and simply love the idea. I have two tea drinkers at work that I am going to try to make these for.
    Reply

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  13. Gerda - I did all my pocket-attaching before I added the back (outside cover) and bound the whole thing - so no, I didn't have any visible stitching on the outside. I wouldn't call it wrong to do so, though - just gives you a different design element! Thanks for all the sweet comments, everyone.

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  14. episode yang ke 49 yah,,, wow,,, keren sekali
    salam silaturahmi
    happy blogging

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  15. thank you so much for the great tutorial. I'm going to try and make a bigger version to use as a document holder.

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  16. bagus yah episode 49 care for some ini

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  17. try to reuse but sometimes you run out of ideas then I will hear about a way you did it, and off I am to try it. Happy Holidays to you and all your family.

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  18. if the material is good, surely the result will also be good eventually. as well as the quality of the stitching will increasingly make quality clothing that is made of a high quality

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  19. all the ingredients are good, but it depends on the quality of his tailoring, and skills

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